VPS stands for Virtual Private Server and refers to a private, emulated dedicated hosting environment created through virtualization on a host (a computer or other device connected to other computers or devices via a network), server (called the “parent server”), or cluster of servers. It acts like a physical server but, in reality, it’s a piece of software that’s emulating dedicated hardware.
You’re paying more, so there SHOULD be a minimum uptime guarantee and better server speed. Look for a host that offers 99.5% at a very minimum, although ideally, I’d rather go with someone who offers 99.9%. Search through some reviews as there are many who have put this to the test. For example, any of WHSR’s many web host reviews include an uptime record as one of our key tests.
With VPS, you pay for what you use in the sense that you select a certain amount of bandwidth and storage to be allocated in advance. Scaling involves resizing your resources. But with cloud hosting, you pay for what you use in that your resource levels are not pre-determined, which means unpredictable pricing that tends to be more costly than VPS due to the overhead and complexity involved.
It all starts with a dedicated server (a.k.a. a bare-metal server). Instead of using it as a dedicated server or dividing it into hundreds of shared accounts, a server owner decides to turn it into dozens of smaller servers (here comes a difference between shared and VPS hosting - with shared hosting you get an ‘account’, while with VPS you get a ‘server’). In order to divide a bare-metal server into several virtual machines (i.e. in order to virtualize a server), we need to install software called hypervisor.
Max Ostryzhko:
The servers are powered by Intel Xeon Gold 6132 processor, having 14 cores / 28 threads. The dedicated 4Gbps network connection promises an outstanding speed.
So that’s it, then – a VPS is for everything in between, right? Well, yes…and no. A VPS (Virtual Private Server) is a flexible solution that falls in between shared and dedicated hosting, not only in price but also in the way it functions. Like a dedicated server, a site hosted on a VPS gets its own RAM and disk space; however, like a shared server, it uses the same processing capacity (CPU) as a certain number of other sites. So, while your site’s performance isn’t reliant on shared RAM and disk space, it is dependent on a shared processor. Moreover, the distribution of processor share varies from provider to provider.  The table below shows how most hosting companies break down the differences between shared, VPS, and dedicated hosting plans:
With VPS, you pay for what you use in the sense that you select a certain amount of bandwidth and storage to be allocated in advance. Scaling involves resizing your resources. But with cloud hosting, you pay for what you use in that your resource levels are not pre-determined, which means unpredictable pricing that tends to be more costly than VPS due to the overhead and complexity involved.

Be careful, though – there are some common traps many people fall into. Firstly, the promotional prices are only on offer for a month, after which you’re paying between $49.99 and $299.99/month on any of its five plans. Secondly, the 30 day, money-back guarantee is only valid for those who subscribe for a year or longer. Everyone else only has 48 hours to claim a refund.


If you host it in a VPS environment, your site won't share resources with neighboring sites, the way it would with shared hosting. In fact, your site lives in a partitioned server area that has its own operating system, storage, RAM, and monthly data transfer limits, so you can expect smoother, more stable site performance. The sites with which you share your server are far less likely to affect your site—or even take it down altogether—than they would be on a shared site. Knowing how VPS setups operate is just the first step, however. You still need to familiarize yourself with the essential features needed for building a rock-solid, VPS-hosted website.
Ask most website owners about hosting and they’ll happily explain what shared, dedicated and cloud hosting is. But when it comes to virtual private servers, lots of them aren’t 100% sure what VPS are or what they’re best suited for. Some don’t even know that there is a VPS hosting option. So, to put everyone clearly in the picture, this article will give you a full introduction to VPS.


Dedicated: True to its name, a dedicated server is entirely yours to utilize. This is usually an option for those with a high volume of traffic or those who choose to customise their website in a specific way. However, it’s an expensive choice that might not be right for you if you’re just starting out or if your requirements aren’t too advanced. VPS offers you the same luxury of privacy and dedicated resources with a small space to rent. It offers you one piece of the whole server which is exclusively yours.
Shared hosting is like you are living in a room with a lot of friends. It means you must fit in the same room and you must split the cost of several things because it is affordable and cheap. However, several individuals are sharing the same space, it means everyone needs to live within a space with restricted resources among them. You will have to use the same things (that sounds a little unhygienic).
Expert Overview :
You’re paying more, so there SHOULD be a minimum uptime guarantee and better server speed. Look for a host that offers 99.5% at a very minimum, although ideally, I’d rather go with someone who offers 99.9%. Search through some reviews as there are many who have put this to the test. For example, any of WHSR’s many web host reviews include an uptime record as one of our key tests.
Quick review: AltusHost is a well-known premium hosting provider based in Netherlands. The company provides rock-solid customer support and offer three different server locations in Europe (Bulgaria, Netherlands, and Sweeden). We think AltusHost may be the right call for small businesses and individual bloggers who want a reliable EU-based hosting solution.
Once you register your website's domain name, it's time to start picking the specs for your server. Web hosts typically offer multiple VPS plans that have varying amounts of email capability, RAM, storage, CPU power, domain hosting, and monthly data transfers. The plans typically include website builders that let you quickly create a face for your site without much—or even any—coding required. A solid web host should offer at least 4GB of RAM, 100GB of storage, and an ample volume of monthly data transfers. If you expect a significant amount of website growth, then you should look for a web host that has as many unlimited offerings as possible. For example, Hostwinds—the PCMag Editors' Choice for VPS hosting—offers unlimited email, domains, and monthly data transfers. Note, however, that as with all unlimited service offerings, you really need to read the fine print to make sure that what you mean by unlimited and what the hosting service means by it.
Essentially, here’s the criteria I would use to judge things – if your site is made up of primarily static, HTML-based content, then you probably don’t need a VPS package.  However, if you have a large amount of files stored, multiple sites, dynamic content, and the possibility of major traffic from time to time, then you might consider upgrading to a VPS. It’s a powerful package that allows you to do more than you could with a shared hosting plan, but requires less investment than a dedicated server.
×