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Essentially, here’s the criteria I would use to judge things – if your site is made up of primarily static, HTML-based content, then you probably don’t need a VPS package.  However, if you have a large amount of files stored, multiple sites, dynamic content, and the possibility of major traffic from time to time, then you might consider upgrading to a VPS. It’s a powerful package that allows you to do more than you could with a shared hosting plan, but requires less investment than a dedicated server.
Keep firmly in your mind the sort of assets that you require to serve your site(s) when seeking a host. Cost in a VPS is important, but not as key as you might think. VPS resource availability is scalable, so the cost that needs to be looked at is comparable cost from one host to the next. Also – as cPanel revised their pricing model recently, web hosting companies across the board will have to pass those costs on to users sooner or later. You will need to consider the cost of control panel when selecting a VPS plan. Companies like ScalaHosting has developed their own control panel to mitigate this issue – so their users would have little issues with the price hike.

One of the most popular recent innovations in cloud hosting plans is the use of operating system snapshots to install full server stack software including popular CMS code and web development frameworks. For example, instead of buying a bare-metal VPS plan and installing all aspects of the OS, Apache software, programming language extensions for the web server, database frameworks, etc. individually or via the command line, system administrators can simply choose a particular stack snapshot and deploy LAMP with the latest Drupal, Redis, Varnish, Zend, Acquia Cloud, & Apache Solr versions all pre-configured under PHP 7 settings. Entire production server portraits can be captured using this method and used for backup/restore, clone site replication, elastic scaling, load balancing with multiple website copies, etc. Snapshots work with Docker containers and Kubernetes as well as VPS plans under KVM, Xen, Virtuozzo, SolusVM, OpenVZ, VMware, etc. virtualization.
Expert Overview:
RAID storage differentials are largely based on the number of disk drives and synchronized duplicate copies of data files available. SSD storage with Docker containers, Kubernetes elastic cloud networks, and isolated VPS/VM partitions are considered fundamentals in cloud data center architecture today. Many shared Linux webhosts make extensive use of SSD storage in VRAM configurations.
Hostinger offers one of the cheapest VPS plans on the market. For only a few bucks a month, you can dip your toes into the world of VPS hosting. The most affordable plan only has 1 CPU core, 1 GB of RAM, and 20 GB of storage. However, the highest plan features 8 cores, 8 GB of RAM, and 160 GB of storage. There are eight plans in total, allowing you to choose the best one for your needs.
Website owners with misconfigured CMS scripts or out of date security versions of code risk MySQL injections particularly that can lead to the theft of an entire database. VPS admin login panels, cPanel logins, FTP connection routes, and email servers running on Apache are all common attack vectors for script bots which are programmed to target common URL structures on domains.
So that’s it, then – a VPS is for everything in between, right? Well, yes…and no. A VPS (Virtual Private Server) is a flexible solution that falls in between shared and dedicated hosting, not only in price but also in the way it functions. Like a dedicated server, a site hosted on a VPS gets its own RAM and disk space; however, like a shared server, it uses the same processing capacity (CPU) as a certain number of other sites. So, while your site’s performance isn’t reliant on shared RAM and disk space, it is dependent on a shared processor. Moreover, the distribution of processor share varies from provider to provider.  The table below shows how most hosting companies break down the differences between shared, VPS, and dedicated hosting plans:
Speaking of email and limits, you'll want the ability to create an unlimited number of accounts. Should your website grow significantly, you'll appreciate being able to scale your email accounts without spending additional money. Web hosts typically place a cap on the amount of storage per email account. In other words, you may be able to create an unlimited number of email accounts, but each one may have a 10GB storage cap. Take time to investigate a potential web host's email offerings so as not to be surprised by its messaging limitations. Again, find out what the unlimited gotchas might be.

The answer to this question is a definitive “maybe.” Since you’re looking at this site, you might be a Web designer who has a few sites, an online portfolio, and a couple of long-standing clients whose sites you manage. Is a VPS for you? Well, you’ve most likely outgrown a shared platform, and as a professional, it won’t do to have your site run poorly because another site that you share a server with is using more than its fair share of resources. A dedicated server could be overkill – if you don’t need all the resources on a consistent basis, you may not be able to justify the expense.
Having your own guaranteed CPU and RAM gives you a great deal of autonomy. You don’t have to share them with any other accounts, so no matter what anyone else does they will never slow you down. Regular shared hosting is okay if your website traffic doesn’t change much, but if there’s a chance it might need more horsepower then VPS is far more flexible. And from a security point of view, the fact that VPS hosting accounts are cleverly separated on the same server makes them much more robust than a shared hosting solution.
The answer to this question is a definitive “maybe.” Since you’re looking at this site, you might be a Web designer who has a few sites, an online portfolio, and a couple of long-standing clients whose sites you manage. Is a VPS for you? Well, you’ve most likely outgrown a shared platform, and as a professional, it won’t do to have your site run poorly because another site that you share a server with is using more than its fair share of resources. A dedicated server could be overkill – if you don’t need all the resources on a consistent basis, you may not be able to justify the expense.
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