Partitioning a single server to appear as multiple servers has been increasingly common on microcomputers since the launch of VMware ESX Server in 2001. The physical server typically runs a hypervisor which is tasked with creating, releasing, and managing the resources of "guest" operating systems, or virtual machines. These guest operating systems are allocated a share of resources of the physical server, typically in a manner in which the guest is not aware of any other physical resources save for those allocated to it by the hypervisor. As a VPS runs its own copy of its operating system, customers have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, and can install almost any software that runs on the OS; however, due to the number of virtualization clients typically running on a single machine, a VPS generally has limited processor time, RAM, and disk space.[2]
Dedicated server hardware is also limited to a single tenant usage whereas VPS hardware is shared by multiple hosting customers on one partitioned web server. The latest trends in web hosting have seen companies move beyond the single server model on cloud, VPS, & shared platforms to host multiple copies of a website's files and use network load balancing software to route traffic to the hardware with the most open processing capacity for better response times.
Essentially, here’s the criteria I would use to judge things – if your site is made up of primarily static, HTML-based content, then you probably don’t need a VPS package.  However, if you have a large amount of files stored, multiple sites, dynamic content, and the possibility of major traffic from time to time, then you might consider upgrading to a VPS. It’s a powerful package that allows you to do more than you could with a shared hosting plan, but requires less investment than a dedicated server.

A2 Hosting offers two VPS options. They are both great options and very affordable. The entry level option is just $9.89 per month, and the Cloud VPS is $15. They are both great choices and will be able to meet all your needs for most entry level or mid-sized sites.

VPS stands for Virtual Private Server and refers to a private, emulated dedicated hosting environment created through virtualization on a host (a computer or other device connected to other computers or devices via a network), server (called the “parent server”), or cluster of servers. It acts like a physical server but, in reality, it’s a piece of software that’s emulating dedicated hardware.


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So that’s it, then – a VPS is for everything in between, right? Well, yes…and no. A VPS (Virtual Private Server) is a flexible solution that falls in between shared and dedicated hosting, not only in price but also in the way it functions. Like a dedicated server, a site hosted on a VPS gets its own RAM and disk space; however, like a shared server, it uses the same processing capacity (CPU) as a certain number of other sites. So, while your site’s performance isn’t reliant on shared RAM and disk space, it is dependent on a shared processor. Moreover, the distribution of processor share varies from provider to provider.  The table below shows how most hosting companies break down the differences between shared, VPS, and dedicated hosting plans:
The more content you add to your website over time, the slower it will run. There are often a few causes for this common problem, but there’s a good chance that your site is slow because you’ve finally hit your shared hosting limits. In order to boost your site’s speed, it’s a good idea to upgrade from shared hosting to VPS hosting to decrease page loading times.
The "slashdot" effect is the main problem which will lead to VPS hosted website crashes more than any other. For example, if a VPS plan has an allocation of 2 GB of RAM and 2 CPU cores with a maximum support for around 200 simultaneous users of a complex Drupal or WordPress site, a popular social media link may temporarily increase traffic to a website 10x or 100x. In these cases, the VPS will crash... unless the overflow can be managed by burstable RAM or elastic cloud scalability. In elastic frameworks, the network monitoring software simply launches a new VPS instance with a cloned & synchronized version of the website files that can manage the additional user demand. When the traffic spikes decrease, elastic server networks can automatically scale down VPS instances to conserve resource utilization in production.
Your organisation may also be interested in helping Debian using your resources. If so, you can donate to us, form ongoing partnerships with us, sponsor our conferences, provide gratis products or services to Debian contributors, provide gratis hosting for Debian service experiments, run mirrors of our software, installation media or conference videos or promote our software and community by provide a testimonial or selling Debian merchandise, installation media, pre-installed systems, consulting or hosting.
Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]
With ChemiCloud you can choose between 4 Cloud VPS plans - all of them fully managed and very powerful. No matter what plan you will choose, you will not have to worry about anything from security updates to server stability, since under the curtains, they are taking care of everything, so you can focus on just growing your business.

Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]


- Free & Effortless Migration for Unlimited Websites
So that’s it, then – a VPS is for everything in between, right? Well, yes…and no. A VPS (Virtual Private Server) is a flexible solution that falls in between shared and dedicated hosting, not only in price but also in the way it functions. Like a dedicated server, a site hosted on a VPS gets its own RAM and disk space; however, like a shared server, it uses the same processing capacity (CPU) as a certain number of other sites. So, while your site’s performance isn’t reliant on shared RAM and disk space, it is dependent on a shared processor. Moreover, the distribution of processor share varies from provider to provider.  The table below shows how most hosting companies break down the differences between shared, VPS, and dedicated hosting plans:
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