The more content you add to your website over time, the slower it will run. There are often a few causes for this common problem, but there’s a good chance that your site is slow because you’ve finally hit your shared hosting limits. In order to boost your site’s speed, it’s a good idea to upgrade from shared hosting to VPS hosting to decrease page loading times.

Managed VPS plans offer a managed environment similar to our shared hosting accounts, but with increased resource availability. If you are outgrowing a shared hosting environment, but are not ready yet to make the leap to a dedicated server, you should consider a managed VPS. This plan is also a good option if you need certain customizations that are not provided with shared hosting plans, but you would still like A2 Hosting to handle configuration changes, software upgrades, and other system administration tasks.
Furthermore, due to the fact that bitcoin transactions take place almost immediately, you will also be able to skip the waiting period which is generally considered a norm while making online transactions. Furthermore, there aren’t any authorization requirements as well, thus saving you even more time.
Unmanaged hosting requires that you ask your IT team members (or, often, a single IT person) to do the work of a skilled, full-time hosting team while also performing their other duties. And, unless you want to open up the risk of downtime, they’ll have to perform those duties 24/7/365. As you can imagine, the results are typically not as good and companies often end up paying more in the long run due to security breaches and downtime when they choose to go with unmanaged hosting.
This is a VPS and cloud hosting provider worth considering for projects of any scale. Anyone, from a small startup to a large enterprise, can find a server, configure it, and deploy it in no time. The company knows the ins-and-outs of professional web hosting. Kamatera is positioning among the leaders of VPS and cloud services thanks to its numerous data centers all around the globe and advanced products.
If you are familiar with hosting control panels, shell commands, and you have basic server administration and troubleshooting skills, then unmanaged VPS is the way to go. Note that while you purchase self­ managed VPS, you should be capable of managing applications, software, services installed on your VPS. Also, you must know installation/un­installations, resource monitoring, server performance tweaking and troubleshooting of any technical issues.
Keep firmly in your mind the sort of assets that you require to serve your site(s) when seeking a host. Cost in a VPS is important, but not as key as you might think. VPS resource availability is scalable, so the cost that needs to be looked at is comparable cost from one host to the next. Also – as cPanel revised their pricing model recently, web hosting companies across the board will have to pass those costs on to users sooner or later. You will need to consider the cost of control panel when selecting a VPS plan. Companies like ScalaHosting has developed their own control panel to mitigate this issue – so their users would have little issues with the price hike.
With VPS, you pay for what you use in the sense that you select a certain amount of bandwidth and storage to be allocated in advance. Scaling involves resizing your resources. But with cloud hosting, you pay for what you use in that your resource levels are not pre-determined, which means unpredictable pricing that tends to be more costly than VPS due to the overhead and complexity involved.
Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]

• Powered by SSD Technology
Expert Overview :

Simply put, shared hosting means your site will share the same server as many other sites. It’s usually the cheapest option but comes with limited bandwidth, administration, and performance capabilities. VPS hosting is a more premium option, with the ability for greater customization and increased performance. But, as with any premium service, you’ll have to pay more to get more.


Unlike managed VPS plans, unmanaged VPS plans are not actively managed by A2 Hosting. Unmanaged VPS plans are for more advanced users who are comfortable using the command-line interface and doing system administration tasks. These plans include root account access so you can customize the server as much as necessary. As a result, you are responsible for the following items:
When smartphones took over in the early 2000s, data usage and cellphone bills went through the roof for many families — mine included. My family’s shared data plan wasn’t perfect — some months, someone would rack up data usage and leave the rest of us strapped — but it allowed each person to pay a lot less per month than if we each had an unlimited data plan.
So that’s it, then – a VPS is for everything in between, right? Well, yes…and no. A VPS (Virtual Private Server) is a flexible solution that falls in between shared and dedicated hosting, not only in price but also in the way it functions. Like a dedicated server, a site hosted on a VPS gets its own RAM and disk space; however, like a shared server, it uses the same processing capacity (CPU) as a certain number of other sites. So, while your site’s performance isn’t reliant on shared RAM and disk space, it is dependent on a shared processor. Moreover, the distribution of processor share varies from provider to provider.  The table below shows how most hosting companies break down the differences between shared, VPS, and dedicated hosting plans:
×