Similarly, in a real dedicated server, you will pay for the entire server that is not shared with anyone else. You will get complete control over all services. Unfortunately, it is also the most expensive hosting option and needs some technical expertise to manage. It is commonly used by those who have websites with specific scenarios, most commonly extremely high traffic and tight security requirements.
both for external and internal use, for documentation purposes. It essentially makes it intuitive for organizations and communities to generate content

When choosing a VPS operating system, there are managed and unmanaged hosting plan options as well as "bare-metal" vs. shared-kernel hypervisor distinctions to consider. Many users upgrading websites from shared hosting plans for better VPS website performance (or more system resources to support web traffic) will look for a managed Linux plan with CentOS and cPanel that will provide the same ease of use in web server settings & domain name administration.
So that’s it, then – a VPS is for everything in between, right? Well, yes…and no. A VPS (Virtual Private Server) is a flexible solution that falls in between shared and dedicated hosting, not only in price but also in the way it functions. Like a dedicated server, a site hosted on a VPS gets its own RAM and disk space; however, like a shared server, it uses the same processing capacity (CPU) as a certain number of other sites. So, while your site’s performance isn’t reliant on shared RAM and disk space, it is dependent on a shared processor. Moreover, the distribution of processor share varies from provider to provider.  The table below shows how most hosting companies break down the differences between shared, VPS, and dedicated hosting plans:
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