Shared hosting is cheap and allows you to install any gallery platform you wish if a hosting plan meets its requirements. But be careful and study your hosting provider’s Acceptable Use Policy thoroughly. The truth is, that even if they claim unlimited storage with their plans, they don’t want you to use much of it. On the contrary, they secretly hope that you will use less and they can host many other clients on the same server. For that reason, hosting providers usually put limitations on their policies (e.g. “no more than 10 GB for images,” etc.). So don’t be convinced that you have unlimited storage without first checking your shared hosting provider's policies or you will find your account suspended someday.
Unmanaged hosting requires that you ask your IT team members (or, often, a single IT person) to do the work of a skilled, full-time hosting team while also performing their other duties. And, unless you want to open up the risk of downtime, they’ll have to perform those duties 24/7/365. As you can imagine, the results are typically not as good and companies often end up paying more in the long run due to security breaches and downtime when they choose to go with unmanaged hosting.
The more content you add to your website over time, the slower it will run. There are often a few causes for this common problem, but there’s a good chance that your site is slow because you’ve finally hit your shared hosting limits. In order to boost your site’s speed, it’s a good idea to upgrade from shared hosting to VPS hosting to decrease page loading times.
- SShield Real-time Cyber-protection & Security
This doesn’t happen with VPS hosting because each mini-server has its own allotment of resources. You can’t use more resources than your allotment, but that also means that no other site can take resources from you. Basically, it is like having a smaller size dedicated server without having to pay the hefty ($100 per month or more) price tag that goes with a dedicated server.
So that’s it, then – a VPS is for everything in between, right? Well, yes…and no. A VPS (Virtual Private Server) is a flexible solution that falls in between shared and dedicated hosting, not only in price but also in the way it functions. Like a dedicated server, a site hosted on a VPS gets its own RAM and disk space; however, like a shared server, it uses the same processing capacity (CPU) as a certain number of other sites. So, while your site’s performance isn’t reliant on shared RAM and disk space, it is dependent on a shared processor. Moreover, the distribution of processor share varies from provider to provider.  The table below shows how most hosting companies break down the differences between shared, VPS, and dedicated hosting plans:
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