Liquid Web has worked hard to build a competitive VPS offering, and as mentioned in this guide, third-party testing has found our VPS hosting outperforms Rackspace, DigitalOcean, and Amazon's. Moreover, our customer reviews will bear out that our customer service and support teams, the Most Helpful Humans in HostingTM, deliver responsive support, pro-active service, and immense value to the businesses we work with.
Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]
Craig Timmins:
You’re paying more, so there SHOULD be a minimum uptime guarantee and better server speed. Look for a host that offers 99.5% at a very minimum, although ideally, I’d rather go with someone who offers 99.9%. Search through some reviews as there are many who have put this to the test. For example, any of WHSR’s many web host reviews include an uptime record as one of our key tests.
Essentially, here’s the criteria I would use to judge things – if your site is made up of primarily static, HTML-based content, then you probably don’t need a VPS package.  However, if you have a large amount of files stored, multiple sites, dynamic content, and the possibility of major traffic from time to time, then you might consider upgrading to a VPS. It’s a powerful package that allows you to do more than you could with a shared hosting plan, but requires less investment than a dedicated server.

Read More


Unmanaged hosting requires that you ask your IT team members (or, often, a single IT person) to do the work of a skilled, full-time hosting team while also performing their other duties. And, unless you want to open up the risk of downtime, they’ll have to perform those duties 24/7/365. As you can imagine, the results are typically not as good and companies often end up paying more in the long run due to security breaches and downtime when they choose to go with unmanaged hosting.
However, if a bad user shares your server with you, they can threaten your security and allow hackers to easily reach your content and critical data. Furthermore, because you’re all sharing the same resources, if any of the users that you’re sharing your server with use a lot of memory or their site has a lot of traffic, your website’s performance is likely to suffer.
×