There are a few downsides to shared hosting, though, mostly because you’re sharing. For instance, if someone else on your shared server has a huge spike in traffic, that could affect your website’s performance. However, if you’re just getting your website off the ground and don’t have huge traffic volume, shared hosting is a great way to get online!

Do you remember those times when you were living on a college campus with very noisy roommates? Or maybe they were super quiet and you enjoyed every day? The point is, it was a gamble - you never knew whom you ended up with. This is pretty much the same as having shared hosting account - you haven’t the faintest idea who is your roommate on a server. The analogy may sound funny but if someone on a shared server becomes a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack target or get blocked for mass mailing, other accounts on the server will be affected as well. Also, if a shared account abuses server resources, the whole server will be impacted. Using a VPS is like owning a house with a 9 foot privacy fence. You won’t be bothered no matter what your neighbors are doing.

If you are just starting your website and don’t receive very much traffic, then shared hosting is the ideal solution. However, if your website’s audience is consistently growing, you’ll want to consider upgrading. You don’t want to run the risk of your website running slowly or, even worse, your server crashing because it can’t handle the traffic. If you anticipate an increase in visitors, do yourself a favor and switch to VPS.

Having your own guaranteed CPU and RAM gives you a great deal of autonomy. You don’t have to share them with any other accounts, so no matter what anyone else does they will never slow you down. Regular shared hosting is okay if your website traffic doesn’t change much, but if there’s a chance it might need more horsepower then VPS is far more flexible. And from a security point of view, the fact that VPS hosting accounts are cleverly separated on the same server makes them much more robust than a shared hosting solution.
A web site that has outgrown shared hosting will benefit from VPS hosting. It is a good problem to have if your website needs more resources than our Shared or Business Hosting can provide you and Hostwinds makes a very strong effort to help you continue to grow and be successful. We make the migration easy for you to a VPS server and using a Tier 3 or Tier 4 with a cPanel license should be pretty familiar to most Hostwinds Shared or Business Hosting clients. Hostwinds VPS services are a good choice to keep your website growing and successful in today’s Cloud first world.
You’ll also Benefit from the Following Features:
You can also set up hosting control panels that will enable you to interact with your server using a GUI. However, we’re not going to cover that in this article, since using the command line is often the more efficient route. Plus, learning how to use simple commands will teach you a lot about server management, which will almost certainly come in handy as your site grows.
Bitcoin users can often even avail additional protection from attacks via services offered by the providers such as Bitcoin DDos protection, which can allow you to fend off any attack whatsoever.

When you create a website, you have to pay a company to host it on their server. This is a powerful computer that allows anyone on the internet to connect and access your site. The lowest level of server is a shared hosting plan where hundreds of websites (and all their data) are stored on one server with all of the server’s resources up for grabs depending on who needs them.
Think of a shared server as a large apartment complex, and all of the individual apartments are rented by other website owners. All of you need a place to live — just like your website’s files — but going out to buy a huge family home would be too expensive for your needs. Sharing common areas and utilities in an apartment block helps keep costs down. And the same is true for shared hosting.
A virtual private server (VPS) is a cost-effective way for a small business to gain more flexibility and efficiency than is offered with shared hosting without the expense associated with running a dedicated server. Most small businesses also don’t need all the power of a dedicated server, so VPS provides a good in-between option when you outgrow your shared hosting. Get the power and flexibility of your own server without the cost and complexity of managing outsourced hardware.

With Cloud VPS, if a parent server has 64 processing cores, it can host up to 64 instances. Each instance is allocated its own bandwidth and storage, so your performance won’t be affected by other companies on the server in the way it might with shared hosting. You also get more bandwidth and storage since the hosting company is limited on the number of instances they can create on each parent server.


If you are familiar with hosting control panels, shell commands, and you have basic server administration and troubleshooting skills, then unmanaged VPS is the way to go. Note that while you purchase self­ managed VPS, you should be capable of managing applications, software, services installed on your VPS. Also, you must know installation/un­installations, resource monitoring, server performance tweaking and troubleshooting of any technical issues.
Proxy literally means “a representative”. It works as an intermediary between your device and the rest of the Internet. When your device sends a request, a proxy intercepts it and checks whether it has requested data in the cache. If yes, it returns the cached version of data without connecting to the requested resource. If not, a proxy server passes your request further but changes your IP to its own. Because of the fact that proxy hides an endpoint device’s IP addresses, it is often confused with a VPN. However, apart from the IP hiding, a VPN and a proxy server are used for different purposes.

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Private VPS Parent Hosting is a way to get the benefits of virtualization without sharing a parent server with other companies. This is a robust, flexible, and isolated virtual solution that gives you sole control over a built-to-order parent server and its resources. That means you can add as many VPS environments as the server allows and control them all as you see fit.

Yuriy Gandyak:
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The servers are powered by Intel Xeon Gold 6132 processor, having 14 cores / 28 threads. The dedicated 4Gbps network connection promises an outstanding speed.

The great news for VPS customers these days is that most web hosting companies offer managed VPS hosting. Here, not only will they set up your server environment, but they’ll also take care of tasks such as software upgrades, security patches, etc. Also, provision time is now greatly reduced and you can be up and running with your VPS hosting much more quickly.
A VPS doesn’t just have more RAM, disk space, and a  proprietary share of CPU than a shared account. Depending on the provider, some VPS plans offer burstable memory, which is a pool of RAM set aside for extraordinary events. This is the stuff that can help counter the so-called “Digg-effect,” that much-whispered about occurrence that’s the simultaneous hope and fear of everyone who runs a web site. When you have an unexpected high traffic event, burstable memory will call on a pool of reserved, shared memory to satisfy the needs of temporary high traffic. This is not available on shared servers and, while the necessary memory is available on a dedicated server, your site might not get the kind of traffic on a daily basis to justify the expense of a dedicated server. Again, not all VPS plans have burstable memory, so ask your provider if their VPS plans do.
I can’t say it as a disadvantage of VPS hosting because many of our VPS hosting customers have server administrator to manage their VPS and they manage it in very efficiently manner. But this doesn’t everyone must have server administrator, we have content-rich knowledge base on VPS hosting for our self-managed customers.Also, a managed service option at very affordable price.


If you are familiar with hosting control panels, shell commands, and you have basic server administration and troubleshooting skills, then unmanaged VPS is the way to go. Note that while you purchase self­ managed VPS, you should be capable of managing applications, software, services installed on your VPS. Also, you must know installation/un­installations, resource monitoring, server performance tweaking and troubleshooting of any technical issues.

So that’s it, then – a VPS is for everything in between, right? Well, yes…and no. A VPS (Virtual Private Server) is a flexible solution that falls in between shared and dedicated hosting, not only in price but also in the way it functions. Like a dedicated server, a site hosted on a VPS gets its own RAM and disk space; however, like a shared server, it uses the same processing capacity (CPU) as a certain number of other sites. So, while your site’s performance isn’t reliant on shared RAM and disk space, it is dependent on a shared processor. Moreover, the distribution of processor share varies from provider to provider.  The table below shows how most hosting companies break down the differences between shared, VPS, and dedicated hosting plans:
Expert Overview

A VPS doesn’t just have more RAM, disk space, and a  proprietary share of CPU than a shared account. Depending on the provider, some VPS plans offer burstable memory, which is a pool of RAM set aside for extraordinary events. This is the stuff that can help counter the so-called “Digg-effect,” that much-whispered about occurrence that’s the simultaneous hope and fear of everyone who runs a web site. When you have an unexpected high traffic event, burstable memory will call on a pool of reserved, shared memory to satisfy the needs of temporary high traffic. This is not available on shared servers and, while the necessary memory is available on a dedicated server, your site might not get the kind of traffic on a daily basis to justify the expense of a dedicated server. Again, not all VPS plans have burstable memory, so ask your provider if their VPS plans do.
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