It all starts with a dedicated server (a.k.a. a bare-metal server). Instead of using it as a dedicated server or dividing it into hundreds of shared accounts, a server owner decides to turn it into dozens of smaller servers (here comes a difference between shared and VPS hosting - with shared hosting you get an ‘account’, while with VPS you get a ‘server’). In order to divide a bare-metal server into several virtual machines (i.e. in order to virtualize a server), we need to install software called hypervisor.
High-availability and reliability seem to be the focus of InMotion VPS hosting. Their state-of-the-art Linux VPS Hosting servers are built on top of InMotion’s cloud-powered infrastructure which is designed for real time redundancy. Their VPS plans come with many advanced and free features, such as SSD storage, free cPanel license, and unlocked CPU cores. All of their VPS plans provide server management for updates and patches as well as 24x7 email and telephone support.
A web site that has outgrown shared hosting will benefit from VPS hosting. It is a good problem to have if your website needs more resources than our Shared or Business Hosting can provide you and Hostwinds makes a very strong effort to help you continue to grow and be successful. We make the migration easy for you to a VPS server and using a Tier 3 or Tier 4 with a cPanel license should be pretty familiar to most Hostwinds Shared or Business Hosting clients. Hostwinds VPS services are a good choice to keep your website growing and successful in today’s Cloud first world.
Similarly, in a real dedicated server, you will pay for the entire server that is not shared with anyone else. You will get complete control over all services. Unfortunately, it is also the most expensive hosting option and needs some technical expertise to manage. It is commonly used by those who have websites with specific scenarios, most commonly extremely high traffic and tight security requirements.
VPS Web Hosting is ideal for business sites and websites that require increased resources to handle more traffic than a shared hosting plan allows. And with Managed VPS Hosting plans simplifying the process, you don’t need to be a tech expert to use VPS Hosting for your websites. Here our three VPS Hosting Plans we would put at the top of any list.
Learning how to set up a VPS after upgrading from shared hosting is like leaving the kiddie pool to dive into an Olympic-sized one. You have a lot more room and features to play with, but you’ll need to find your footing before you can start having fun. Now that you know how to configure your VPS, you’ve become acquainted with the command line, which will make it a lot easier to set everything up to your liking.
If you are just starting your website and don’t receive very much traffic, then shared hosting is the ideal solution. However, if your website’s audience is consistently growing, you’ll want to consider upgrading. You don’t want to run the risk of your website running slowly or, even worse, your server crashing because it can’t handle the traffic. If you anticipate an increase in visitors, do yourself a favor and switch to VPS.

I can’t say it as a disadvantage of VPS hosting because many of our VPS hosting customers have server administrator to manage their VPS and they manage it in very efficiently manner. But this doesn’t everyone must have server administrator, we have content-rich knowledge base on VPS hosting for our self-managed customers.Also, a managed service option at very affordable price.

You’re paying more, so there SHOULD be a minimum uptime guarantee and better server speed. Look for a host that offers 99.5% at a very minimum, although ideally, I’d rather go with someone who offers 99.9%. Search through some reviews as there are many who have put this to the test. For example, any of WHSR’s many web host reviews include an uptime record as one of our key tests.
Partitioning a single server to appear as multiple servers has been increasingly common on microcomputers since the launch of VMware ESX Server in 2001. The physical server typically runs a hypervisor which is tasked with creating, releasing, and managing the resources of "guest" operating systems, or virtual machines. These guest operating systems are allocated a share of resources of the physical server, typically in a manner in which the guest is not aware of any other physical resources save for those allocated to it by the hypervisor. As a VPS runs its own copy of its operating system, customers have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, and can install almost any software that runs on the OS; however, due to the number of virtualization clients typically running on a single machine, a VPS generally has limited processor time, RAM, and disk space.[2]

One of the most important factors that you need to keep in mind is the operating system of your server. Currently, Linux and Windows are the two most popular operating systems being offered by providers. Since Linux is an open source software, it costs less than Windows. In addition, it is also considered to be more user friendly while supporting a far greater range of applications as well.

On the other hand, there are still some applications which are only supported on Windows and not on Linux. Hence, if you use technologies such as ASP.NET and ASP, then you may be better off with Windows rather than Linux.


A virtual private server (VPS) is a virtual machine (something like a computer divided into many smaller machines using special software).[1] They are often used by Internet hosting providers. Multiple VPS's run on the same machine, but they are separated as they will only share hardware resources without interfering on software level. A VPS is dedicated to the customer's needs, has the privacy of a separate physical computer, and can run server software. There are many platforms that can run a VPS. Some of them are VMWare and Xen.[2]

Yes, VPS is a powerful and versatile type of hosting that many companies will find meets their needs. If you’re already hosting in a different type of environment, you may be wondering whether it’s worthwhile to migrate to VPS. This is an important discussion to have with each prospective hosting provider in order to understand how they handle migrations, what would be required from you, how long it might take, and any costs associated.
Time4VPS is very affordable. It has a variety of reasonably priced plans, starting from just 2.99 EUR/month. 


Don't see a service that fits your specific hosting needs? Don't worry, we have you covered! We offer a wide range of solutions bound to meet your requirements ranging from Shared, Reseller, VPS, Dedicated and everything in between including Managed WordPress Hosting. Looking for a new domain name or SSL Certificate? We've got you covered there as well! Just click the button below to visit our Web Hosting comparison page. That's where you'll see a full breakdown of all of our high speed hosting services.
You also get the following benefits:
With VPS Hosting, there are multiple instances of separate operating systems on a machine—thus giving you your own virtual private server. So while you still may be sharing a physical server at the data center, with your own virtual operating system, you’re able to have dedicated resources such as RAM, bandwidth, and disk space. In other words, the environment mimics having a dedicated server—at a lower cost!
So that’s it, then – a VPS is for everything in between, right? Well, yes…and no. A VPS (Virtual Private Server) is a flexible solution that falls in between shared and dedicated hosting, not only in price but also in the way it functions. Like a dedicated server, a site hosted on a VPS gets its own RAM and disk space; however, like a shared server, it uses the same processing capacity (CPU) as a certain number of other sites. So, while your site’s performance isn’t reliant on shared RAM and disk space, it is dependent on a shared processor. Moreover, the distribution of processor share varies from provider to provider.  The table below shows how most hosting companies break down the differences between shared, VPS, and dedicated hosting plans:
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