To sum up, a Windows server is more friendly to beginners but is less flexible and more expensive. A Linux server is cheaper and offers more freedom though it requires special skills and does not have a developed support system. Still, the most important question you need to ask yourself is whether your main goal requires Windows or Linux. If you need a Linux server for your needs but do not have required skills to manage it, you can sign up for a managed VPS.
Expert Overview
Shared hosting is like you are living in a room with a lot of friends. It means you must fit in the same room and you must split the cost of several things because it is affordable and cheap. However, several individuals are sharing the same space, it means everyone needs to live within a space with restricted resources among them. You will have to use the same things (that sounds a little unhygienic).

Think of a shared server as a large apartment complex, and all of the individual apartments are rented by other website owners. All of you need a place to live — just like your website’s files — but going out to buy a huge family home would be too expensive for your needs. Sharing common areas and utilities in an apartment block helps keep costs down. And the same is true for shared hosting.


A VPS runs its own copy of an operating system (OS), and customers may have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, so they can install almost any software that runs on that OS. For many purposes they are functionally equivalent to a dedicated physical server, and being software-defined, are able to be much more easily created and configured. They are priced much lower than an equivalent physical server. However, as they share the underlying physical hardware with other VPSes, performance may be lower, depending on the workload of any other executing virtual machines.[1]
Craig Timmins:

Craig Timmins:
The great news for VPS customers these days is that most web hosting companies offer managed VPS hosting. Here, not only will they set up your server environment, but they’ll also take care of tasks such as software upgrades, security patches, etc. Also, provision time is now greatly reduced and you can be up and running with your VPS hosting much more quickly.
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A VPS runs its own copy of an operating system (OS), and customers may have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, so they can install almost any software that runs on that OS. For many purposes they are functionally equivalent to a dedicated physical server, and being software-defined, are able to be much more easily created and configured. They are priced much lower than an equivalent physical server. However, as they share the underlying physical hardware with other VPSes, performance may be lower, depending on the workload of any other executing virtual machines.[1]
Max Ostryzhko:
A VPS doesn’t just have more RAM, disk space, and a  proprietary share of CPU than a shared account. Depending on the provider, some VPS plans offer burstable memory, which is a pool of RAM set aside for extraordinary events. This is the stuff that can help counter the so-called “Digg-effect,” that much-whispered about occurrence that’s the simultaneous hope and fear of everyone who runs a web site. When you have an unexpected high traffic event, burstable memory will call on a pool of reserved, shared memory to satisfy the needs of temporary high traffic. This is not available on shared servers and, while the necessary memory is available on a dedicated server, your site might not get the kind of traffic on a daily basis to justify the expense of a dedicated server. Again, not all VPS plans have burstable memory, so ask your provider if their VPS plans do.

With Cloud VPS, if a parent server has 64 processing cores, it can host up to 64 instances. Each instance is allocated its own bandwidth and storage, so your performance won’t be affected by other companies on the server in the way it might with shared hosting. You also get more bandwidth and storage since the hosting company is limited on the number of instances they can create on each parent server.
As you can see, a VPS can be the perfect middle ground for many – enough flexibility and resources for those who need more access or control than on a shared server but without the cost of a dedicated server. If you need root access, you can’t get that on a shared server, but you can get it on a VPS. If your site experiences unpredictable swings memory usage, and your host provides it, then the presence of burstable memory will be attractive. And, if you’re a fan of customization, then the fact that you can customize server-level software such as PHP, MySQL, and Apache will perk your interest.  In short, choosing a VPS will allow you to have many of the same characteristics of a dedicated server but in a more affordable and manageable package.
And if your “neighbor” on the server is hacked, there’s little chance the infection will spread to your VPS because the hypervisors that are used to create separate VPS environments deliver multi-layered network security and keep tight controls on what enters and leaves. Your root access also means you can add or customize your VPS security software as you please.

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The force driving server virtualization is similar to that which led to the development of time-sharing and multiprogramming in the past. Although the resources are still shared, as under the time-sharing model, virtualization provides a higher level of security, dependent on the type of virtualization used, as the individual virtual servers are mostly isolated from each other and may run their own full-fledged operating system which can be independently rebooted as a virtual instance.

Nice read Rahul ! While you compare all hosting types, I would like to point out one important thing related to shared hosting. Undoubtedly, VPS hosting has become the most popular hosting type in short span, but shared hosting has its own benefits. First and most important one is – Shared Hosting is by Default Fully Managed, that means you don’t have to worry about security of your website, server updates, software update, spamming from your mailboxes, etc.

To sum up, a Windows server is more friendly to beginners but is less flexible and more expensive. A Linux server is cheaper and offers more freedom though it requires special skills and does not have a developed support system. Still, the most important question you need to ask yourself is whether your main goal requires Windows or Linux. If you need a Linux server for your needs but do not have required skills to manage it, you can sign up for a managed VPS.
When smartphones took over in the early 2000s, data usage and cellphone bills went through the roof for many families — mine included. My family’s shared data plan wasn’t perfect — some months, someone would rack up data usage and leave the rest of us strapped — but it allowed each person to pay a lot less per month than if we each had an unlimited data plan.

Similarly, in a real dedicated server, you will pay for the entire server that is not shared with anyone else. You will get complete control over all services. Unfortunately, it is also the most expensive hosting option and needs some technical expertise to manage. It is commonly used by those who have websites with specific scenarios, most commonly extremely high traffic and tight security requirements.
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