The great news for VPS customers these days is that most web hosting companies offer managed VPS hosting. Here, not only will they set up your server environment, but they’ll also take care of tasks such as software upgrades, security patches, etc. Also, provision time is now greatly reduced and you can be up and running with your VPS hosting much more quickly.

So that’s it, then – a VPS is for everything in between, right? Well, yes…and no. A VPS (Virtual Private Server) is a flexible solution that falls in between shared and dedicated hosting, not only in price but also in the way it functions. Like a dedicated server, a site hosted on a VPS gets its own RAM and disk space; however, like a shared server, it uses the same processing capacity (CPU) as a certain number of other sites. So, while your site’s performance isn’t reliant on shared RAM and disk space, it is dependent on a shared processor. Moreover, the distribution of processor share varies from provider to provider.  The table below shows how most hosting companies break down the differences between shared, VPS, and dedicated hosting plans:
Furthermore, due to the fact that bitcoin transactions take place almost immediately, you will also be able to skip the waiting period which is generally considered a norm while making online transactions. Furthermore, there aren’t any authorization requirements as well, thus saving you even more time.

Cloud VPS is a type of hosting where multiple companies use isolated instances on the same host or parent server. This is perhaps the most common type of VPS hosting — when you hear someone talk about VPS, it’s most likely Cloud VPS. As you probably guessed based on the word “cloud,” another benefit is that you can access your Cloud VPS environments from anywhere.

Similarly, in a real dedicated server, you will pay for the entire server that is not shared with anyone else. You will get complete control over all services. Unfortunately, it is also the most expensive hosting option and needs some technical expertise to manage. It is commonly used by those who have websites with specific scenarios, most commonly extremely high traffic and tight security requirements.
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With VPS, you pay for what you use in the sense that you select a certain amount of bandwidth and storage to be allocated in advance. Scaling involves resizing your resources. But with cloud hosting, you pay for what you use in that your resource levels are not pre-determined, which means unpredictable pricing that tends to be more costly than VPS due to the overhead and complexity involved.
12/04/2019 at 9:00 a.m. (Eastern Standard Time) and
Yes, it’s secure. VPS security comes from each instance’s isolation from the other environments on the server. Contrast that with shared hosting, where environments are sharing the same resources and can be affected by each other’s vulnerabilities. A denial of service attack on a website in a shared environment can bring down other companies’ data and websites hosted on that server, where each VPS environment is isolated and protected.
The force driving server virtualization is similar to that which led to the development of time-sharing and multiprogramming in the past. Although the resources are still shared, as under the time-sharing model, virtualization provides a higher level of security, dependent on the type of virtualization used, as the individual virtual servers are mostly isolated from each other and may run their own full-fledged operating system which can be independently rebooted as a virtual instance.
Learning how to set up a VPS after upgrading from shared hosting is like leaving the kiddie pool to dive into an Olympic-sized one. You have a lot more room and features to play with, but you’ll need to find your footing before you can start having fun. Now that you know how to configure your VPS, you’ve become acquainted with the command line, which will make it a lot easier to set everything up to your liking.
There will be a point in your life where the needs of your website will be too much for a shared hosting server to manage and VPS hosting will eventually become a necessity for you. Meanwhile, you need to take great care to ensure that the VPS which you select is appropriate for your needs and requirements. Hence, you need to start by making a list of your requirements and then comparing various servers before coming to a conclusion on the best possible server for you.

While using a shared hosting server, you do not have access to the entire server, unlike in a VPS, where the entire virtual server is under your complete control. Hence, either you or someone you employ will have to look after the server and ensure that its performance remains optimum. If your VPS provider takes charge of maintaining the server, it is known as a managed server. On the other hand, in an unmanaged VPS, the entire responsibility of the server will rest on your shoulders.
However, if a bad user shares your server with you, they can threaten your security and allow hackers to easily reach your content and critical data. Furthermore, because you’re all sharing the same resources, if any of the users that you’re sharing your server with use a lot of memory or their site has a lot of traffic, your website’s performance is likely to suffer.
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